The Wirelss World from 1930

THE WIRELESS WORLD.

By Magna Vox.

NEWS AND NOTES. (Part)

From the Otago Daily Times , Issue 20993, 4 April 1930, Page 5.

RADIO EXHIBITION.

Hearing KGO in 1924

LISTENING IN.

AN INITIATION CEREMONY.

HEARING K.G.O. (By MASKEE.)

From the Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 179, 30 July 1924, Page 8.

“Come round to-night.”‘ said Jenkins, as I swung on a neighbouring strap in our morning tramcar. “You will have a real treat; you will be able to hear K.G.O.”. Who or what K.G.O. was I had not the faintest idea. The cryptic letters conveyed to me merely a sense of my inferiority, mill I was loath to seek explanation under the gaze of many envious eyes turned in the direction of our conversation. To display ignorance of radio terms in these enlightened days is tantamount to being unable to recognise a Ford car, either by eye or by ear. So, in a fit of misguided enthusiasm I declared that nothing would keep me from hearing K.G.O.

A DX-PEDITION from 1928

A RADIO QUEST.

ROUND THE WORLD.

CITY ENTHUSIASTS SEEK NEW STATIONS.

(By “Experimenter.”)

From the Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19338, 16 June 1928, Page 10.

Although a very pleasant evening may be spent listening to New Zealand and Australian broadcast, this form of radio entertainment is poor sport when compared with the fun to be had in searching the air in the hope of “logging” stations on the other side of the world, or, to put it in radio parlance, hunting for “DX” —the radio symbol for distance.

Radio Notes from 1934

RADIO NOTES (Part)

Prepared for the Guardian by STENTOR.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LV, Issue 64, 14 August 1934, Page 2.

Mr D. N. Adams, of Timaru, has been the successful competitor in the DX Cup competition, logging 546 verified stations. This competition originated some years ago, and each year the advance made in the number of stations logged has been amazing, indicating not only the worldwide growth of radio, but the great advances made in the construction of radio receivers. In 1931, 291 stations were logged, 366 the next-year, 416 in 1933, early this year 500, and now 546. Another remarkable feature of the competition is that on all four occasions the coveted trophy has been won by the aid of a Majestic receiver, a splendid tribute to the high standard of quality maintained by this well-known instrument.

Radio Notes from 1933

RADIO NOTES

(Written for the Guardian). By “Screen Grid.”

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LI, Issue 39, 19 May 1933, Page 3.

STATIC ELIMINATION from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

STATIC ELIMINATION. A NOVEL METHOD.

(specially written for “The Press.”)

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18533, 7 November 1925, Page 6.

One of the greatest problems of present-day radio reception is static, which is sometimes known as atmospherics. Since wireless communication was first put into practice engineers hare striven and tried all possible methods and means to overcome this obstacle.

WHAT NOT TO DO – WORDS TO THE UNWISE – 1929

WHAT NOT TO DO

WORDS TO THE UNWISE

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVII, Issue 3316, 23 April 1929, Page 6.

In breezy Australian language a Brisbane paper offers some advice to the wireless fraternity:—

Loud speakers were not meant to blow tiles off roofs. Do not try to.

Do not regenerate unto others because you would not like others to regenerate unto you.

Do not strike matches on your panel. The piano is much better.

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER from 1928

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER

From the Evening Post, Volume CV, Issue 86, 12 April 1928, Page 7

America’s chief problem in connection with broadcasting is that their are too many broadcasters. They run into hundreds, and they cause serious interference. In connection with this difficulty it is frequently suggested that the shorter wave-lengths should be used. Those who, having a limited knowledge of the matter, bring this simple solution forward, overlooking a number of facts. One of these is that short waves are not suitable for transmission over short distances. Another “crash” is thus discussed in’ “Radio Broadcast”:

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET from 1931

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLV, Issue 3179, 23 December 1927, Page 6.

Broadcast Band Log from 1931

BROADCAST BAND LOG.

From the New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20938, 30 July 1931, Page 15.

SIXTEEN AMERICAN STATIONS — FOUR-VALVE BATTERY SET USED.

With reference to DX loggings Mr. S. Beard, of 239, Great North Road, Grey Lynn, writes as follows:-

I was particularly interested in the radio notes published on July 16, especially the log submitted by Mr. A. Satchell, of Northcote, which he states was received on an eight-valve set. My aerial is 80ft. in length and 40ft. high. I am using a locally-built four-valve battery set (no screen grid) and my log for four months comprises the following American stations:— “KGO, KFI, KPO, KNX, KFAR, California; WTAM, WLW, Ohio; KMOX, St. Louis, Missouri; WABC, New York City; KVCO, Tulsa, Oklahoma; WHDH, Boston, Massachusetts; WFAA, WOAI, Texas, WENR, Chicago, Illinois; KJR, Seattle, Washington; and KZRM, Manila, Philippine Islands.

D.X. with 2-Valve Set in 1928

D.X. WITH 2-VALVE SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVI, Issue 3222, 25 May 1928, Page 6.

EXAGGERATED DX RECORDS from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

EXAGGERATED DX RECORDS

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18419, 27 June 1925, Page 6

RADIO NOTES from 1924

Radio Notes

Bay of Plenty Times, Volume LII, Issue 8645, 28 July 1924, Page 2

By Rheostat

A new radio principle has been introduced in the latest American receiving set, known as “Unidyne.” The valves are operated without ‘B’ batteries, or without high tension current of any description. The invention is described as one of the greatest advances in radio matters within recent times.

LONG HIGH AERIALS from 1927

LONG, HIGH AERIALS.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLV, Issue 3174, 6 December 1927, page 6

Letters to Editor & Introduction of SW to NZ

SHORT-WAVE BROADCASTING STATION

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXXIII, Issue 22247, 11 November 1937, Page 9

TO THE EDITOR OF THE PRESS.

Sir—The portion of “Listener’s” letter “who listens … entertainment value,” calls for some comment, as it is quite obvious that your correspondent is ignorant of the value of reports sent to radio stations. If his statement that the stations are pestered with useless reports is true, why do the stations request reports from listeners, especially to the extent of broadcasting special programmes after their regular transmitting hours? These programmes are extra expense to the stations and the officials would not waste time and money if reports were useless, and these “Specials” sometimes last two hours.

OVERSEAS APPRECIATION from 1934

OVERSEAS APPRECIATION

From the Evening Post, Volume CXVIII, Issue 118, 15 November 1934, Page 23

In “Radio News and the Short Wave,” an American publication appeared, in a recent number, a paragraph expressing warm appreciation of the New Zealand DX Radio Association:—

ADDRESS ON DISTANCE RECEPTION from 1932

A RADIO NIGHT.

Christchurch Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20663, 28 September 1932, Page 8

ADDRESS ON DISTANCE RECEPTION. The Canterbury Branch of the New Zealand D.X. Club held an informal evening yesterday in connexion with the “Come to Christchurch” Week effort. There was a large attendance of members and the public, testifying to the increasing popularity of long distance broadcast listening.

The Editor’s Trip To Wellington

THE EDITOR’S TRIP TO WELLINGTON

By “NOSEY”

From the September 1939 issue of “TUNE IN”

As the story of the editor’s trip to Wellington may interest “Tune In’s” readers “Nosey” will endeavour to describe it to the best of his ability.

Before going any further, maybe those RA members who have never had the misfortune to meet Alf. Greenway, may like to know what he looks like, so here is a pen picture of him. He is between 20 and 40 years of age, about 5 or 6 feet in height; weighs something between 8 and 12 stone; isn’t a scrap like Clark Gable, and doesn’t wear a hat (he lost it a few years ago in Dunedin, so joined the hatless brigade.) A fuller description and a photograph could probably be seen at any Police Station.

A Radio Wedding

A RADIO WEDDING

From August 1938 issue of

TUNE IN”

The marriage of Miss Milli-Amp to Mr. Micro Farad is the talk of the Radio World. The bride belongs to the well-known Current family and the groom is also popular. The bride’s father, Mr. A. C. Current, gave his daughter away, and her sister, Miss Uni Current acted in the capacity of bridesmaid. The reception, which was held at the home of the bride’s parents, was very successful. Miss Xmitter gave an exhibition of the “Frequency Creep” and also rendered a song – “Wobulation”. This turn upset things a little and there was a rush to the busbar, where the groom became a fixed condenser. After an overload of juice, his di-electric gave way and he collapsed in a short-circuit. This unfortunate accident was the cause of the reception being damped out. The couple left on a kilocycling Tour and we extend our best wishes to the couple.

A Perception Of Sunspots From 1939

SUNSPOT ACTIVITY

From the December 1939 issue of

TUNE IN”