HOW TO CONNECT YOUR “WORLD BAND RADIO” TO A “EWE” ANTENNA etc THROUGH INDUCTIVE COUPLING FOR MEDIUM WAVE DX:

HOW TO CONNECT YOUR “WORLD BAND RADIO” TO A “EWE” ANTENNA etc THROUGH INDUCTIVE COUPLING FOR MEDIUM WAVE DX:

Written by Bill Marsh (Jnr)

This article is the result of my helping Tony King interface his Tecsun PL-380 to a EWE antenna. Tony had been using an external ferrite rod antenna to inductively couple to his 380 for some time and latterly with single layer former wound coils.

As I was intending to replace my aging Sangean ATS-909 with a Tecsun PL-880 I thought his idea would be a great avenue to explore. I did not want to break the seal on my new Tecsun to carry out internal modifications.

4XG Gore 1548 kHZ – Radio New Zealand

I am currently in Invercargill visiting family. Whilst going through some of my sister’s old photographs the other day I came across a verification card addressed to my mother. 4XG Gore was operating on a temporary warrant at this time. The year 1979 is way past my dad (Bill Marsh Snr) interest in sending out reports. I can only suspect the transmission by this station has some important significance as I am not aware of a call 4XG. I am assuming that my dad realised the significance of this transmission and my mother wrote the report and she received the verification. Can anybody provide some history on this station as it has me completely puzzled.

Tecsun S-8800 SSB Portable

S-8800-English-Manual Here is a new portable receiver to be released shortly by Tecsun Australia.  It receives SSB, has a multitude of filter options and has external antenna connections. Full coverage.

Tecsun PL-365 SSB Portable

PL-365-MANUAL There has been recent interest in portable receivers. This is quite a nifty little portable with external MW connection. It is the SSB equivalent of the Tecsun PL-360 with a new DSP chip. Available ex Australia. It is understood to be the same design as the U.S.A. County Comm GP-5/SSB Handheld AM FM SW Radio Receiver which was designed as a low cost unit for military and similar uses.

Dedicated SDR for League Members

Another benefit of belonging to the NZRDXL is use of a 4-channel KiwiSDR receiver located in an excellent receive location at Russell in the Bay of Islands.

Map credit: www.takepa.com

The League established the SDR to provide members an opportunity to be able to hear signals otherwise buried in noise and interference at their home locations. These days, the DXer’s home environment is much noisier electrically than it was 20 years ago and for many the enthusiasm to DX was curbed by this problem. The advent of SDRs and widespread availability of an internet connection has made DXing from a very quiet location with a good antenna possible from your armchair, sitting in  a vehicle with your smart phone and in your traditional place of DXing, the radio shack.

FM DX Antenna & Tuner

I decided to try a bit of FM DX after a break of more than 20 years and
needed a new antenna.

First I tried a 7 element log periodic yagi, similar to this example but found the local FMers about 3km away swamped the whole band pretty much. So then I re-built the antenna into one of these combo yagis  which is a hybrid log periodic yagi and standard yagi, sometimes called a “logyag”.

It handles the signals from the locals much better than the straight LPY
and seems to be more directional. Mine is made from old low-band TV
antennas so only cost me some hardware and time.

Bill Marsh’s Portable EWE Antenna Project

Bill Marsh Jnr has completed an article on building a portable EWE antenna, view the article here.

Australia To Leave SW Broadcasting

ra

ABC Exits Shortwave Radio Transmission

*06 December 2016*

The ABC will end its shortwave transmission service in the Northern Territory and to international audiences from 31 January 2017.

The move is in line with the national broadcaster’s commitment to dispense with outdated technology and to expand its digital content offerings including DAB+ digital radio, online and mobile services, together with FM services for international audiences.

The majority of ABC audiences in the Northern Territory currently access ABC services via AM and FM and all ABC radio and digital radio services are available on the VAST satellite service.

2016 Annual General Meeting

agm-2016-group_sm

Attendees: Bryan Clark, Paul Aronsen, Sutton Burtenshaw, Phil Van de Paverd, Peter Mott, Steven Greenyer, John Akersten & George Muzyka

Pdf_iconAnnual Meeting of the New Zealand Radio DX League – 2016

The Wirelss World from 1930

THE WIRELESS WORLD.

By Magna Vox.

NEWS AND NOTES. (Part)

From the Otago Daily Times , Issue 20993, 4 April 1930, Page 5.

RADIO EXHIBITION.

Hearing KGO in 1924

LISTENING IN.

AN INITIATION CEREMONY.

HEARING K.G.O. (By MASKEE.)

From the Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 179, 30 July 1924, Page 8.

“Come round to-night.”‘ said Jenkins, as I swung on a neighbouring strap in our morning tramcar. “You will have a real treat; you will be able to hear K.G.O.”. Who or what K.G.O. was I had not the faintest idea. The cryptic letters conveyed to me merely a sense of my inferiority, mill I was loath to seek explanation under the gaze of many envious eyes turned in the direction of our conversation. To display ignorance of radio terms in these enlightened days is tantamount to being unable to recognise a Ford car, either by eye or by ear. So, in a fit of misguided enthusiasm I declared that nothing would keep me from hearing K.G.O.

A DX-PEDITION from 1928

A RADIO QUEST.

ROUND THE WORLD.

CITY ENTHUSIASTS SEEK NEW STATIONS.

(By “Experimenter.”)

From the Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19338, 16 June 1928, Page 10.

Although a very pleasant evening may be spent listening to New Zealand and Australian broadcast, this form of radio entertainment is poor sport when compared with the fun to be had in searching the air in the hope of “logging” stations on the other side of the world, or, to put it in radio parlance, hunting for “DX” —the radio symbol for distance.

Radio Notes from 1934

RADIO NOTES (Part)

Prepared for the Guardian by STENTOR.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LV, Issue 64, 14 August 1934, Page 2.

Mr D. N. Adams, of Timaru, has been the successful competitor in the DX Cup competition, logging 546 verified stations. This competition originated some years ago, and each year the advance made in the number of stations logged has been amazing, indicating not only the worldwide growth of radio, but the great advances made in the construction of radio receivers. In 1931, 291 stations were logged, 366 the next-year, 416 in 1933, early this year 500, and now 546. Another remarkable feature of the competition is that on all four occasions the coveted trophy has been won by the aid of a Majestic receiver, a splendid tribute to the high standard of quality maintained by this well-known instrument.

Radio Notes from 1933

RADIO NOTES

(Written for the Guardian). By “Screen Grid.”

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LI, Issue 39, 19 May 1933, Page 3.

STATIC ELIMINATION from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

STATIC ELIMINATION. A NOVEL METHOD.

(specially written for “The Press.”)

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18533, 7 November 1925, Page 6.

One of the greatest problems of present-day radio reception is static, which is sometimes known as atmospherics. Since wireless communication was first put into practice engineers hare striven and tried all possible methods and means to overcome this obstacle.

WHAT NOT TO DO – WORDS TO THE UNWISE – 1929

WHAT NOT TO DO

WORDS TO THE UNWISE

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVII, Issue 3316, 23 April 1929, Page 6.

In breezy Australian language a Brisbane paper offers some advice to the wireless fraternity:—

Loud speakers were not meant to blow tiles off roofs. Do not try to.

Do not regenerate unto others because you would not like others to regenerate unto you.

Do not strike matches on your panel. The piano is much better.

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER from 1928

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER

From the Evening Post, Volume CV, Issue 86, 12 April 1928, Page 7

America’s chief problem in connection with broadcasting is that their are too many broadcasters. They run into hundreds, and they cause serious interference. In connection with this difficulty it is frequently suggested that the shorter wave-lengths should be used. Those who, having a limited knowledge of the matter, bring this simple solution forward, overlooking a number of facts. One of these is that short waves are not suitable for transmission over short distances. Another “crash” is thus discussed in’ “Radio Broadcast”:

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET from 1931

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLV, Issue 3179, 23 December 1927, Page 6.

Broadcast Band Log from 1931

BROADCAST BAND LOG.

From the New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20938, 30 July 1931, Page 15.

SIXTEEN AMERICAN STATIONS — FOUR-VALVE BATTERY SET USED.

With reference to DX loggings Mr. S. Beard, of 239, Great North Road, Grey Lynn, writes as follows:-

I was particularly interested in the radio notes published on July 16, especially the log submitted by Mr. A. Satchell, of Northcote, which he states was received on an eight-valve set. My aerial is 80ft. in length and 40ft. high. I am using a locally-built four-valve battery set (no screen grid) and my log for four months comprises the following American stations:— “KGO, KFI, KPO, KNX, KFAR, California; WTAM, WLW, Ohio; KMOX, St. Louis, Missouri; WABC, New York City; KVCO, Tulsa, Oklahoma; WHDH, Boston, Massachusetts; WFAA, WOAI, Texas, WENR, Chicago, Illinois; KJR, Seattle, Washington; and KZRM, Manila, Philippine Islands.

D.X. with 2-Valve Set in 1928

D.X. WITH 2-VALVE SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVI, Issue 3222, 25 May 1928, Page 6.