Category Archives: Medium Wave

X-Band Coax Loop

xloop1Bill Marsh Jnr. has recently completed his X-band coaxial loop antenna (tunes 550-1700kHz). The full article appears here.

Did Anyone Notice???

3senWith the struggle for AM radio audiences, what happens when a station suddenly goes dark? Like 3SEN Melbourne 1116kHz:

A brazen bald burglar has stolen about $10,000 worth of gear from Melbourne (VK3) radio station SEN 1116 and wheeled it away in a rubbish skip — all while presenters were on air in their Richmond Studios.

The sports radio station lost much studio equipment including microphones!

Detective Senior Constable Drew Laughlin said the crime appeared to be opportunistic, as the man was able to break into the building through an unlocked door from the carpark about 11.40pm.

Greenland Returns to MW

greenland

Paul Rawdon reporting in DX Dialog provided this item (a very tough catch from New Zealand!):

Good news from Greenland. It has been revealed a few hours ago, that KNR is to return to three Medium Wave frequencies following a lot of criticism about the lack of reception of KNR on the sea and outside towns and villages in Greenland.

Three MW frequencies are expected to return:

Qeqertarsuaq – anytime between October 1st and December 1st 2014
Nuuk  – anytime between January and March 2015
Simiutaq, Qaqortoq –  approx.  June 1st 2015

Radio Caroline Drops Anchor

English: MV Ross Revenge, home of Radio Caroli...

English: MV Ross Revenge, home of Radio Caroline from 1983. Photographed in 1984 at anchor in the Knock Deep channel of the southern North Sea. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

And another famous pirate has made the news, this time in this Essex Chronicle article. Broadcasting will resume from “The Ross Revenge” on a short-term license as Radio Caroline chases a full-time permit to operate on the Blackwater, serving the towns of Maldon and Dengie as well as the surrounding area, and no doubt DXers!

AES Stations Part 2

80-November 1945-36

Click to enlarge.

SABC Broadcast Stations In 1943

 

sabc1Historical article:

BROADCAST BAND DX

 bcb2

Listen For These Stations:

Here we present a list of all known stations in the South African Broadcasting Corporation’s network. This list may be of interest to our WA DX’ers particularly, as several stations from South Africa have been logged in that State.

Best listening time for these stations in WA is from around midnight till about 5.30 am WA time, and In the Eastern States, listen around 5.00 am AEST.

560 kc., Grahamstown, No. 1.

600 kc., Capetown No. 1.

620 kc., Bloemfontein. No. 2.

Broadcast Band DX In 1939

bcb1

Historical article:

Since the very first issue of Radio and Hobbies, (April 1939), it has been a matter of policy to provide, each month, the best possible information for short-wave listeners. However, we have often wondered how many of our readers are interested in long distance and overseas reception on the broadcast band. Here are some broadcast band DX notes, compiled by Mr. Roy Hallett. If you are interested, drop us a line and we will see what can be done about making this a regular feature.

bcb2

The Aussie Broadcast Band In 1946

Aussie BC Stations Jan 1946s

click to enlarge

Gary DeBock & The Ferrite Sleeve Loop

FSL15+in+US+De+BockThanks to Tony King reporting on the DX Dialog reflector, here is a photo of Gary DeBock with his invention, the Ferrite Sleeve Loop. “Gary DeBock’s latest creation with which he is scoring many NZ stations on his Tecsun PL380. Probably about 200 ferrite rods on this “sausage roll” .pic attached.  He’s in the right uniform, and his PL380 lives in an NZ emblazoned mobile phone pouch I sent him last year.” Rumour has it one or two Kiwis are building them!

And also from Gary is a Youtube video of his antenna picking up trans-Pacific DX from New Zealand.

NAAMB On The Future Of The US AM Band

Amplitude modulation; vectorial version of [:I...

 

The FCC has made proposals to ensure the future of the AM broadcast band. However, the National Alliance of AM Broadcasters is not in full agreement with the way officialdom has mapped out the future. More in this article from the Radio & Music website.

 

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FCC to Revive AM Radio

Logo of the United States Federal Communicatio...

Have just read an interesting article in the ‘New York Times’ about concern in the USA over the fall in audiences for AM radio. It’s also worth noting that AM’s historical links are recognised in the article and the medium is described as “a cultural touchstone”. And five of the biggest commercial money-spinners in the US radio market are AM stations.
73.
Martin
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Analogue Radio Days Numbered

redradio

Thanks to Andy Gardner for posting the following link on the DX Dialog reflector:

Commercial stations and the BBC expected to confirm the switchover to digital services, 40 years after Britain’s first independent station opened.

Here’s the story from the Independent’s website.

Video of WLW’s 500,000 Watt AM Transmitter

Cincinnati's 700 WLW

Photo Credit: Wikipedia

Following on from an earlier post, Bill Smith in Iowa forwarded this link to a video of WLW’s very powerful transmitter.

WLW radio tower

WLW radio tower (Photo credit: Pez King)

Related articles

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Ever Wondered What Radio Kiribati Sounds Like?

kiribati_14802_front

Radio Kiribati QSL card

Then click on this link on Paul Walker’s On Air DJ website.

In a posting to the MW DX user-group, Paul comments:

‘For your listening pleasure, another aircheck/recording of Radio Kiribati AM 1440. Operating with 10,000 Watts from about 1000 miles south of Hawaii.

I got another aircheck on CD via regular mail today and thought I’d share it with others.
Here’s the link to the 50 minute recording:
http://www.onairdj.com/RadioKiribati_1440Khz_August2013.mp3Radio Kiribati only does one hour of english programming each night at 6pm.

A few notes of interest from my point of view…..To a person like me who isn’t up on languages, it sounds as if the Kiribati language has some hints of some Asian language like Japanese/Chinese almost.

A Quest to Save AM Before It’s Lost in the Static

Hallicrafters SX-28 tuning dial, circa 1945

Hallicrafters SX-28 tuning dial, circa 1945 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Could it be that the AM band survives FM, Pandora, DAB, satellite and the internet threat, only to fall victim to interference from smart phones and  digital devices?

In addition to the tablets, smart phones etc, more and more household appliances are utilising inverters for voltage regulation and speed control in an effort to improve efficiency and earn more energy stars.

In commerce and industry, inverters and variable speed drives are widely used for motor control, to reduce starting currents and offer other control benefits.

Radio Hauraki Film On the Way

hauraki_front

Via Bryan Clark reporting on the DX Dialog reflector: The following posted to the DXLD Yahoo Group yesterday by Mike Terry:

The film ‘3 Mile Limit’ about Radio Hauraki New Zealand is now in post production. There is no official Trailer yet but there is this clip on YouTube.

“Auckland Viaduct, October 1966: a group of determined young men defy the police and government and, to the cheering of their fans, launch a coastal ship that has been converted to a pirate radio station which they intend to use to broadcast from the Hauraki Gulf.

ZBVI Tower Upgrade

zbvi

When the MW band opened into the Caribbean, many NZ DXers checked 780kHz for the chance of a rare new country, British Virgin Islands.

Well, chances of snaring this rarity may have improved. Thanks to Paul Rawdon who forwarded this item from the MW DX group to the NZRDXL “DX Dialog” e-mail reflector:

I’ve gotten word construction on their new 300 foot tower has begun. In fact, the tower is standing at about 160 feet.

Blast from the Past – KPOA Honolulu

Tony King has provided this audio clip of KPOA Honolulu… recorded in 1976. Enjoy…

Blast from the Past – KMVI Wailuku

Tony King provided the following clip of KMVI, Wailuku, Maui, Hawaii on 550kHz. Enjoy..

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Blast from the Past – Radio Cayman

caymans_ltr

Radio Cayman was one of the most regular of Caribbean stations heard in New Zealand. The split frequency of 1555kHz gave it solus position and the bird song interval signal prior to the 1100z sign-on was magical to hear. They were also heard signing off around 0500z some days.

Thanks to Tony King, here is their sign-off  announcement: