Author Archives: Bill Marsh

STATIC ELIMINATION from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

STATIC ELIMINATION. A NOVEL METHOD.

(specially written for “The Press.”)

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18533, 7 November 1925, Page 6.

One of the greatest problems of present-day radio reception is static, which is sometimes known as atmospherics. Since wireless communication was first put into practice engineers hare striven and tried all possible methods and means to overcome this obstacle.

WHAT NOT TO DO – WORDS TO THE UNWISE – 1929

WHAT NOT TO DO

WORDS TO THE UNWISE

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVII, Issue 3316, 23 April 1929, Page 6.

In breezy Australian language a Brisbane paper offers some advice to the wireless fraternity:—

Loud speakers were not meant to blow tiles off roofs. Do not try to.

Do not regenerate unto others because you would not like others to regenerate unto you.

Do not strike matches on your panel. The piano is much better.

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER from 1928

AMERICA’S CROWDED ETHER

From the Evening Post, Volume CV, Issue 86, 12 April 1928, Page 7

America’s chief problem in connection with broadcasting is that their are too many broadcasters. They run into hundreds, and they cause serious interference. In connection with this difficulty it is frequently suggested that the shorter wave-lengths should be used. Those who, having a limited knowledge of the matter, bring this simple solution forward, overlooking a number of facts. One of these is that short waves are not suitable for transmission over short distances. Another “crash” is thus discussed in’ “Radio Broadcast”:

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET from 1931

PORTABLE RADIO HOLIDAY SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLV, Issue 3179, 23 December 1927, Page 6.

Broadcast Band Log from 1931

BROADCAST BAND LOG.

From the New Zealand Herald, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20938, 30 July 1931, Page 15.

SIXTEEN AMERICAN STATIONS — FOUR-VALVE BATTERY SET USED.

With reference to DX loggings Mr. S. Beard, of 239, Great North Road, Grey Lynn, writes as follows:-

I was particularly interested in the radio notes published on July 16, especially the log submitted by Mr. A. Satchell, of Northcote, which he states was received on an eight-valve set. My aerial is 80ft. in length and 40ft. high. I am using a locally-built four-valve battery set (no screen grid) and my log for four months comprises the following American stations:— “KGO, KFI, KPO, KNX, KFAR, California; WTAM, WLW, Ohio; KMOX, St. Louis, Missouri; WABC, New York City; KVCO, Tulsa, Oklahoma; WHDH, Boston, Massachusetts; WFAA, WOAI, Texas, WENR, Chicago, Illinois; KJR, Seattle, Washington; and KZRM, Manila, Philippine Islands.

D.X. with 2-Valve Set in 1928

D.X. WITH 2-VALVE SET.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVI, Issue 3222, 25 May 1928, Page 6.

EXAGGERATED DX RECORDS from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

EXAGGERATED DX RECORDS

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18419, 27 June 1925, Page 6

RADIO NOTES from 1924

Radio Notes

Bay of Plenty Times, Volume LII, Issue 8645, 28 July 1924, Page 2

By Rheostat

A new radio principle has been introduced in the latest American receiving set, known as “Unidyne.” The valves are operated without ‘B’ batteries, or without high tension current of any description. The invention is described as one of the greatest advances in radio matters within recent times.

LONG HIGH AERIALS from 1927

LONG, HIGH AERIALS.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLV, Issue 3174, 6 December 1927, page 6

Letters to Editor & Introduction of SW to NZ

SHORT-WAVE BROADCASTING STATION

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXXIII, Issue 22247, 11 November 1937, Page 9

TO THE EDITOR OF THE PRESS.

Sir—The portion of “Listener’s” letter “who listens … entertainment value,” calls for some comment, as it is quite obvious that your correspondent is ignorant of the value of reports sent to radio stations. If his statement that the stations are pestered with useless reports is true, why do the stations request reports from listeners, especially to the extent of broadcasting special programmes after their regular transmitting hours? These programmes are extra expense to the stations and the officials would not waste time and money if reports were useless, and these “Specials” sometimes last two hours.

OVERSEAS APPRECIATION from 1934

OVERSEAS APPRECIATION

From the Evening Post, Volume CXVIII, Issue 118, 15 November 1934, Page 23

In “Radio News and the Short Wave,” an American publication appeared, in a recent number, a paragraph expressing warm appreciation of the New Zealand DX Radio Association:—

ADDRESS ON DISTANCE RECEPTION from 1932

A RADIO NIGHT.

Christchurch Press, Volume LXVIII, Issue 20663, 28 September 1932, Page 8

ADDRESS ON DISTANCE RECEPTION. The Canterbury Branch of the New Zealand D.X. Club held an informal evening yesterday in connexion with the “Come to Christchurch” Week effort. There was a large attendance of members and the public, testifying to the increasing popularity of long distance broadcast listening.