Monthly Archives: June 2016

The Wirelss World from 1930

THE WIRELESS WORLD.

By Magna Vox.

NEWS AND NOTES. (Part)

From the Otago Daily Times , Issue 20993, 4 April 1930, Page 5.

RADIO EXHIBITION.

Hearing KGO in 1924

LISTENING IN.

AN INITIATION CEREMONY.

HEARING K.G.O. (By MASKEE.)

From the Auckland Star, Volume LV, Issue 179, 30 July 1924, Page 8.

“Come round to-night.”‘ said Jenkins, as I swung on a neighbouring strap in our morning tramcar. “You will have a real treat; you will be able to hear K.G.O.”. Who or what K.G.O. was I had not the faintest idea. The cryptic letters conveyed to me merely a sense of my inferiority, mill I was loath to seek explanation under the gaze of many envious eyes turned in the direction of our conversation. To display ignorance of radio terms in these enlightened days is tantamount to being unable to recognise a Ford car, either by eye or by ear. So, in a fit of misguided enthusiasm I declared that nothing would keep me from hearing K.G.O.

A DX-PEDITION from 1928

A RADIO QUEST.

ROUND THE WORLD.

CITY ENTHUSIASTS SEEK NEW STATIONS.

(By “Experimenter.”)

From the Press, Volume LXIV, Issue 19338, 16 June 1928, Page 10.

Although a very pleasant evening may be spent listening to New Zealand and Australian broadcast, this form of radio entertainment is poor sport when compared with the fun to be had in searching the air in the hope of “logging” stations on the other side of the world, or, to put it in radio parlance, hunting for “DX” —the radio symbol for distance.

Radio Notes from 1934

RADIO NOTES (Part)

Prepared for the Guardian by STENTOR.

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LV, Issue 64, 14 August 1934, Page 2.

Mr D. N. Adams, of Timaru, has been the successful competitor in the DX Cup competition, logging 546 verified stations. This competition originated some years ago, and each year the advance made in the number of stations logged has been amazing, indicating not only the worldwide growth of radio, but the great advances made in the construction of radio receivers. In 1931, 291 stations were logged, 366 the next-year, 416 in 1933, early this year 500, and now 546. Another remarkable feature of the competition is that on all four occasions the coveted trophy has been won by the aid of a Majestic receiver, a splendid tribute to the high standard of quality maintained by this well-known instrument.

Radio Notes from 1933

RADIO NOTES

(Written for the Guardian). By “Screen Grid.”

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume LI, Issue 39, 19 May 1933, Page 3.

STATIC ELIMINATION from 1925

WIRELESS NEWS.

STATIC ELIMINATION. A NOVEL METHOD.

(specially written for “The Press.”)

(By “Electra.”)

From the Christchurch Press, Volume LXI, Issue 18533, 7 November 1925, Page 6.

One of the greatest problems of present-day radio reception is static, which is sometimes known as atmospherics. Since wireless communication was first put into practice engineers hare striven and tried all possible methods and means to overcome this obstacle.

WHAT NOT TO DO – WORDS TO THE UNWISE – 1929

WHAT NOT TO DO

WORDS TO THE UNWISE

From the Ellesmere Guardian, Volume XLVII, Issue 3316, 23 April 1929, Page 6.

In breezy Australian language a Brisbane paper offers some advice to the wireless fraternity:—

Loud speakers were not meant to blow tiles off roofs. Do not try to.

Do not regenerate unto others because you would not like others to regenerate unto you.

Do not strike matches on your panel. The piano is much better.